Call of Juarez: Gunslinger

An appealing FPS, which knows you’re out to put bullets in heads and doesn’t try to pair those bullets with a dissonant art-game story that would make any critical person want to put the guns away. The same reasons that make the Old West a pitiable, stupid realm unworthy of being romanticised also reveal what an FPS appeals to: the drunken braggart in the saloon of every man’s heart. I didn’t love it, but I enjoyed it for a couple days, and it was cheap–75% off, and the MSRP was surprisingly only fifteen bucks at launch.

I had a motion sickness issue, but I seemed to solve it when I cranked the field of view up all the way from 82.72° to 110° in a settings file.

I liked the unreliable narrator effect, which warped the gameplay experience slightly as Silas would forget to mention objects in the room, or would tell events out of sequence. The encouraged fast-pace set by the combo multiplier set the game on the more exciting end of the FPS spectrum, although it was no Bulletstorm, and the selection of guns and skills felt limited compared to Bioshock Infinite, or the latter two thirds of the Mass Effect trilogy. The quick-draw western duels were creative, but not especially fun to do, and I didn’t stay interested in the game long enough to do anything more than a cursory examination of itsResident Evil Mercenaries-style arcade mode.

The reviewer finds this game hard to get excited about, but still has a positive opinion of it. It may be somewhat fun, having good features or ideas counterbalanced by a few boring parts, bad design or other fundamentally irritating qualities that can’t easily be overlooked. Alternatively, it could be pleasant, but with nothing new to offer. Worth a little money if you’ve got the time for it.
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